Author: patrick

What I Told Betsy DeVos as the Mother of a Transgender Girl

What I Told Betsy DeVos as the Mother of a Transgender Girl Debi with daughter Avery. National Center for Transgender Equality Oct 27, 2017 by Debi Jackson, Family Organizer   When Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos traveled to my hometown of Kansas City recently, she visited two schools that are supportive of LGBTQ students — specifically their transgender students — which matters to me as the parent of a transgender child. But that may have given her a rosy picture of what life is like for trans youth in the middle of the country. I wanted to be sure she heard other stories to have...

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Telling your Your Children that you are Transgender: A Step-by-Step Guide

    By Cassie Brighter Photo by Caroline Hernandez I’ll start by discussing some important pre-requisite considerations you should keep in mind before you ever open your mouth. Things To Consider Your Parenting Style My parenting style has always been very purposefully informal, relaxed and non-hierarchical. This is the standard generational response to my own father being the exact opposite of that — an authoritarian, a disciplinarian, and a stoic impenetrable wall when it came to his own feelings. One distinct, and quite sad, memory I have of my teen years is a rough argument with my father where he had wronged me in...

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Julia Grant, the first trans woman to share her story on primetime British TV, has died at the age of 64 following a short illness.

Julia Grant, the first trans woman to share her story on primetime British TV, has died at the age of 64 following a short illness. Ms Grant rose to prominence after appearing in the 1979 BBC documentary, A Change Of Sex. The BBC Two show, and its four follow-ups, told the story of her transition. David Pearson, who directed the series, described her as a “pioneer” who helped start “a huge change in public attitudes towards trans people”. Ms Grant survived bowel cancer in recent years but suffered from multiple health problems in 2018 and died on 2 January....

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How to become an ally to transgender individuals

How to become an ally to transgender individuals The following are tips that can be used as you move toward becoming a better ally to transgender people. Of course, this list is not exhaustive and cannot include all the “right” things to do or say because often there is no one “right” answer to every situation you might encounter. When you become an ally of transgender people, your actions will help change the culture, making society a better, safer place for transgender people – and for all people who do not conform to conventional gender expectations. You can’t tell if someone is transgender just by looking. Transgender people don’t look any certain way or come from any one background. Many transgender people do not appear “visibly trans,” meaning they are not perceived to be transgender by others. It is not possible to look around a room and “see” if there are any transgender people. (It would be like a person looking around the room to “see” if there are any gay people.) You should assume that there may be transgender people at any gathering.   Don’t make assumptions about a transgender person’s sexual orientation. Gender identity is distinctly different from sexual orientation. Sexual orientation is about who we’re attracted to. Gender identity is about our own personal sense of being a man or a woman, or outside that gender binary. Transgender people can be gay, lesbian, bisexual, or straight....

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My intersex life: Now I have a new penis, I hope I will find love

My intersex life: Now I have a new penis, I hope I will find love By Sarah McDermottBBC Stories 26 October 2018 Earlier this year, 23-year-old Anick – who was born intersex – was getting ready for the last in a series of operations that would give him a fully-functioning penis. The BBC followed his progress. “I’ve lost count of how many doctors and nurses have seen me naked over the years,” says Anick. “In the past few years alone it’s been more than 100.” Anick was born with genitals that didn’t resemble either a boy’s or a girl’s. “The doctors said to my parents: ‘This child is mostly like a boy, but we’re not sure yet,'” he says. He did have testicles but they were in the wrong place, so his first operation – to move them – came at the age of four months. Throughout his childhood, people would tell Anick that he wasn’t really like other boys. “I knew there was something different about me, but I didn’t understand what,” he says. “I knew that my parents loved me, but at the same time they were taking me to the hospital every six months, where the doctors would use words like ‘abnormal’ and ‘atypical’ when they were talking about me.” He found it hard to make friends at school, and remembers holding his breath as a...

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